Eltife’s Taxing Vision Of Conservatism

A Republican state senator wants to sell Texans on the idea raising taxes is “the conservative thing to do.” State Sen. Kevin Eltife and fellow transportation panelists at an Austin forum advocated raising the state’s gas tax; at least one called for a 25 percent hike.


State Senator Kevin Eltife
Mr. Eltife, R-Tyler, is no stranger to fiscal irresponsibility. He has a cumulative “F” on the Fiscal Responsibility Index.

Speaking at the Texas Transportation Forum in Austin, Mr. Eltife advocated raising the state’s gas tax. Rather than efficiently restructure spending, Eltife is quoted as saying, “There are times when taxes are the conservative thing to do.” (At least he’s consistent. In 2009, Senator Eltife voted to allow counties to impose gas taxes and motor vehicle fees, as well as to keep higher gas taxes in a TxDOT reauthorization bill.)

Predictably, the grow-government Austin audience cheered Mr. Eltife, who added: “I was fine before I came to this office, and if they kick me out of office I’ll be fine.”

(Mr. Eltife should try advocating a massive tax-hike in Tyler and see what response his voters provide…)

CLICK HERE to tell your legislators to oppose any new tax or tax increase!
Another panelist echoed Mr. Eltife’s sentiment, saying a 25-percent increase in the gas tax should be considered. “Would anybody notice?” the panelist asked.

Probably everyone, thank you for asking.

Increasing the gasoline tax means more than just making gas prices go up; nothing in the economy would be spared the deleterious effects of such a misguided effort.

Raising the inefficient gasoline tax to fund an inefficient transportation system would be like throwing sand in the engine of the state’s economy.

Fortunately, not everyone shares Mr. Eltife’s big-tax vision for a less prosperous Texas.

State Rep. Larry Phillips (R-Sherman) told the Houston Chronicle he didn’t see support for a gas-tax hike. Mr. Phillips chairs the House Transportation Committee.

Taxpayers must make their voices heard so lawmakers know raising any taxes — and especially the gasoline tax — simply isn’t an option in 2013.